Teishoku


 

Teishoku? What’s that?

For starters, in case you’re unsure, it reads  “tay-shoh-kooh” and it is a basic Japanese meal with several dishes.

You can eat teishoku in some restaurants, as well as at home, if the person doing the cooking is in the mood to prepare a bunch of different dishes. In other words, that’s more or less your typical Japanese “full meal”.

Of course, recipes and contents will vary from place to place, region to region and, well, cook to cook, but here is a somewhat typical example (I ate this past week and it was delicious):

 

teishoku

 

What’s inside this one?

From left to right, up to down:

First row:

  • Tempura: lightly deep-fried (i.e. not gross like in the US) food items: fish, shrimp, okra, slice of pumpkin, slice of sweet potato and chikuwa.
  • Sashimi: here, salmon, scallops, cuttlefish and hamachi (Japanese amberjack or yellowtail, probably one of my favorite fish to eat as sashimi).

Second row:

  • Sauce for the tempura.
  • “Ara no nitsuke”: pieces of fish that can’t be used for sashimi or other “nicer” dishes, and that are simmered.
  • Chawanmushi: a typical Japanese custard that is not sweet but on the contrary salty and that contains various types of food (shrimp, gingko, mushrooms, etc).

Third row:

  • Rice.
  • Tsukemono (literally: “pickled things”). That can be eaten as is or on the rice.
  • Seaweed and daikon (Japanese radish) salad.
  • Miso soup.

 

If you visit Japan, make sure you eat a Teishoku at least once during your trip.

Bon Appétit. 🙂

 

 


About David Billa

David was born and raised in the French South West. After a few years in the US and a few more in Paris, he finally settled down in Japan. He blogs here about his various experiences and travels, with an emphasis on his home country, France.

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